10 Things I Liked Enough to Share With You: 10 Oct 2016

one.

“Fact-Checking Family Folklore With DNA Tests,” by Cameron McWhirter for The Wall Street Journal:

I am descended, at least partially, from liars.

 

I recently learned this fact by delving into the expanding world of internet genealogical research. Advances in the size and scope of vast digital databases, as well as the low cost of DNA testing, have made it easier than ever to learn about one’s family tree, and whether everything you’ve heard at family gatherings all your life is true.

 

two.

“Nine Places Where You Can Still See Wheel Tracks from the Oregon Trail,” by Jennifer Billock for SMITHSONIAN.COM: 

Any child of the 1980s is familiar with the basic skeleton of the Oregon Trail, from the celebrations warranted by a sight of Chimney Rock to the dangers of running a team of oxen at a grueling pace with meager rations. But even devoted players of the classic computer game, which turned 45 this year, may not know that relics of the trail itself are still carved into the landscapes of the United States.

 

three.

“Why Women Pretended to Be Creepy Rocks and Trees in NYC Parks During WWI,” by Lauren Young for Atlas Obscura:

Imagine taking a quiet stroll through the expansive wilderness of Van Cortlandt Park in Bronx, New York. You’re surrounded by a forest of oak trees, stony ridges, and a tranquil lake—completely isolated and alone in nature. But in 1918, visitors to the 1,146-acre park were unaware that they were in the company of a group of women hiding among the rocks, trees, and grass.

 

four.

“New York Public Library Digitizes 137 Years of New York City Directories,” by Philip Sutton for New York Public Library Blog:

New York Public Library is digitizing its collection of New York City Directories, 1786 through 1922/3, serving them free through the NYPL Digital Collections portal. The first batch—1849/50 through 1923—have already been scanned, and the 1786–1848/9 directories are right now being scanned. The whole collection will be going online over the coming months.

 

five.

“Bigger Museum Will Give Lady Liberty’s Crowds More to Do Than Snap Selfies,” by James Barron for The New York Times:

It is time for a backyard construction project on an island with a resident population of one and a transient population of 4.3 million.

 

six.

October is Family History Month. Join the fun on Instagram with @genealogyphoto by posting a genealogy-related photo each day. 🙂

 

seven.

c. 1906-1911- Ellis Island immigrants, in color,” by Alex Q. Arbuckle for Mashable:

These photographs show a tiny handful of the more than 12 million immigrants who entered the United States through the immigration station at New York’s Ellis Island between 1892 and 1954. The men and women portrayed are wearing their finest clothes, often their national dress, brought with them from their homeland to America.

 

eight.

“Out of the ashes – An Irishman’s Diary on the Irish Genealogical Research Society,” by Steven Smyrl for The Irish Times:

When the dust had settled over the ruins of Sackville Street at the end of Easter Week 1916, down at the Four Courts, the deputy keeper of the records, MJ McEnery, found that despite the building being occupied and its contents disturbed, the Public Record Office of Ireland had escaped virtually unscathed.

 

 nine.

“Remember your Roots: Kids and family history,” by Joyce Russell for NWI.COM:

You are never too young or too old to learn about your family’s history.

 

ten.

“How an amateur genealogist solved a 48-year-old ‘Jane Doe’ case,” by Brenda Gazzar Los Angeles Daily News. Kudos to my friend Rita Hood for cracking this case!

The petite woman with bleached blond hair was found slumped over a picnic table near Mount Hollywood Drive inside Los Angeles’ scenic Griffith Park.

 

 

 

10 Things I Liked Enough to Share With You: 26 Sept 2016

one.

“Long-Lost Sisters: A dream come true for a MyHeritage employee,” by Esther for the MyHeritage Blog:

When Linoy Maidvanikov Simon began working at MyHeritage 18 months ago, she never dreamed that her life would change forever.

 

two.

“WikiTree Announces Source-a-Thon,” by Eowyn Langholf for the WikiTree Blog. Get ready, get set, cite your sources!

WikiTree will be kicking off Family History Month with a three-day sourcing marathon, October 1-3, 2016. Individuals and organizations from around the genealogy community are coming together to support this event by donating door prizes for participants. Over $3,000 in genealogy prizes have already been pledged.

WikiTree Source-a-Thon

 

three.

“George Washington’s Biracial Family Is Getting New Recognition,” by Danny Lewis for SMITHSONIAN.COM:

The Founding Fathers may have declared that all men were created equal, but when it came to slaves, they sang a different tune. Many of these men, including George Washington, owned hundreds of slaves on their farms and plantations. Now, the National Park Service is acknowledging centuries-old rumors that Washington’s adopted son fathered children with slaves, making the family biracial to its roots.

 

four.

“Viking sailors took their cats with them,” by Charlotte Price Persson for ScienceNordic:

The world’s first large study into ancient cat DNA reveals that the earliest ancestors of our furry friends reached Eurasia and Africa at the same time as early farmers, and were later helped by mariners, including the Vikings.

freyja_riding_with_her_cats_1874

 

five.

“Family Heirloom, National Treasure: Rare Photos Show Black Civil War Soldiers,” by Cheryl Corley for KOSU.org:

Each of the photos in Capt. William A. Prickitt’s album could fit in a locket: headshots of 17 black soldiers who served under the Union Army officer during the Civil War, most of their names handwritten on the mat surrounding the images.

 

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seven.

“Work to restore First World War soldier’s Droitwich memorial can begin after appeal leads to relative coming forward,” by Tristan Harris for Droitwich Standard:

WORK to renovate the Droitwich memorial of a soldier killed in the First World War will now be able to take place after a relative was found to give permission for the maintenance to happen..

 

eight.

“DNA Just Tied A Mystery Death In Australia To Thomas Jefferson,” by Dan Vergano for BuzzFeed News:

The dead man reclined against a beach wall that morning in a suit and tie, with an unlit cigarette resting on his collar, as if merely dozing on the pristine sand.

 

“I beg to report that on the morning of the 1st December, 1948, an unidentified body of a man was found on the beach of Somerton,” began the police report. Investigators found no missing persons, immigrants, or ship’s deserters to explain the “Somerton Man,” one of Australia’s most enduring cold-case mysteries.

 

 nine.

“‘My God, that’s Kimberly!’: Scientist solves perplexing mystery of identity thief Lori Ruff,” by Maureen O’Hagan for The Seattle Times:

The Seattle Times in 2013 published a real-life mystery story about Lori Ruff, who died in 2010, leaving a husband and child in Texas. Years earlier, she had stolen another person’s identity. Who was she really? Finally, we have an answer.

 

ten.

“Homeowners Buy Back the Family Homestead,” from The Wall Street Journal:

Who says you can’t go home again? Thanks to widespread interest in genealogy and a wealth of public records online, it has never been easier to track down – and buy back – former family homes.

 

 

 

10 Things I Liked Enough to Share With You: 18 July 2016

one.

“Mormon Genealogy Event Recruits Thousands to Save the World’s Records,” by Heather Hemingway for Chron. Even if you missed the weekend’s Worldwide Indexing Event, it’s never too late to get involved with this awesome project:

For those working on family history, nothing is more frustrating than getting stuck on an ancestral line due to little or no historical information. FamilySearch, however, can help. From July 15 to 17, FamilySearch hosted a worldwide indexing event with more than 100,000 volunteers. These volunteers helped make old records available in FamilySearch’s database.

 

two.

“‘Ice Age: Collision Course’ wants you to find your pets’ animal ancestry,” by Mark Pacis for NERD REACTOR. This was a fun diversion that made me laugh out loud. Although I’m more than a little disturbed that my dog is 30% Sid:

We’ve all wondered at one point where our family has come from. Websites like ancestry.com have given us the opportunity to trace our genealogy through several generations. However, have you ever wondered what your pet’s genealogy would be like? Wonder no more.

Animal Ancestry

 

three.

“Something very old: Bride wears 200-year-old family veil on wedding day,” by Eleanor Lees for BT.com:

38-year-old Emma Marsh didn’t know about the veil, believed to have been worn by six generations of family, until her mother showed it to her after her engagement.

 

four.

“Man who went on a quest for his family history discovers 220-year-old Bible. Here’s what was inside,” by Billy Hallowell for Deseret News:

A man who went on a personal quest to learn more about his family heritage recently discovered that a centuries-old Bible that belonged to his great-great-great-great-great-grandfather is still in existence.

 

five.

“Family whose ancestors travelled the Underground Railroad reunites in Toronto,” from Metronews.com:

One hundred and sixty-four years ago, William Henson Holland left his family behind in Maryland and risked his life to travel the Underground Railroad to Canada. His brother Thomas John wasn’t far behind.

 

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seven.

“Into the fold: The mother who taught her daughter how to hand sew kilts,” by Victoria Pease for STV News. While I’ll admit that I’m having serious Outlander withdrawals, this is still a sweet story:

Beverley Scarlett has been making kilts by hand for the past 15 years, and when her daughter asked to learn how to create the traditional Scottish garments, the 64-year-old not only agreed, but helped to set up a national qualification in the skill.

 

eight.

“Faces of the men who won America’s independence: Amazing early photos of heroes of the Revolutionary War in their old age,” from DailyMail.com. None of my ancestors, but stunning nonetheless:

These stunning images are early photographs of some of the men who bravely fought for their country in the Revolutionary War some 237 years ago.

Revolutionary War Faces

 

nine.

 

ten.

“Art and archives: Old image plates find new life and purpose at Catapult Creative House,” by Lindsay Jones for Southeast Missourian:

About a month ago, some facilities management personnel at Southeast Missouri State University were going through a storage area and made a discovery that would become an intriguing project for Terry Davis.

 

 

10 Things I Liked Enough to Share With You: 9 May 2016

one.

“Three Siblings Abandoned As Newborns By Same Mom At Separate Times Meet For First Time,” by Marc Dorian, Lauren Putrino, and Alexa Valiente for ABC NEWS (if you missed the 20/20 episode on Friday, May 6, here’s the story):

It was early morning in 1981, when a young woman in Lawndale, California, called police to report discovering a baby in a paper grocery bag next to a dumpster in a nearby alley.

 

two.

“A suitcase full of secrets found in Amsterdam’s Jewish quarter after 70 years,” from DutchNews.nl:

Cities are shaped by their past: it courses through them like blood, unseen but vital. Charlaine Scholten’s boyfriend told her about the suitcase in his attic shortly after they started dating last February. It was a hard brown leather case, weighing about 30 kilos, familiar from those black-and-white photographs where cases are piled high on the quayside behind families waiting to board passenger steamers for a new life across the ocean. When Charlaine sprung open the brass clasps, it began a year-long quest spanning three continents and 70 years of history.

 

three.

“Canadians Are Completely Nerding Out On The Long-Form Census,” by Craig Silverman for BuzzFeedNews:

The long-form census is back in Canada for the first time in a decade and 👏 people 👏 are 👏 pumped to fill out a detailed government form. Statistics!.

 

four.

“22 photos which prove that your genes are amazing,” from Bright Side:

Genetic inheritance is an amazing thing. Sometimes, when you look at different members of one family, it seems as if nature is being downright lazy; you could say that all it’s doing is using the ‘copy & paste’ function!

 

five.

“The Hidden Messages of Colonial Handwriting,” by Cara Giaimo for Atlas Obscura:

Imagine a world in which the font you use is chosen for you, based entirely on your demographic affiliations. All doctors write in Garamond, while designers are mandated Futura Bold. Middle-aged men get Arial; women, Helvetica. Goofy aunts must use Comic Sans.

 

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seven.

“How Women Mapped the Upheaval of 19th Century America,” by Laura Bliss for CityLab:

In the explosive 19th century, women produced maps (entire atlases, actually) that attempted to make sense of America’s relatively new nationhood, its boundaries and beliefs, and who belonged there. In the maps presented here, women cartographers conveyed both facts and fictions about a country in upheaval, and developed new visual techniques in the process.

 

eight.

“4,000 people break Guinness World Record for largest human DNA helix,” by WORLD ENTERTAINMENT NEWS NETWORK for KUTV.com:

On Saturday, April 23, at the South Beach in Varna, Bulgaria, 4,000 people managed to break the Guinness World Record for the largest human DNA helix.

 

nine.

“Database of Holocaust victims reaches 1 million names,” from The Times of Israel:

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com announced Friday that records of one million people persecuted by the Nazis are now available to be searched.

 

ten.

“The REAL da Vinci code: DNA from the Italian master’s paintings will being used to reconstruct his face and trace his relatives,” by Colin Fernandez for THE DAILY MAIL:

While the face of the Mona Lisa is famous the world over, the face of its painter Leonardo da Vinci is a mystery.

 

But that all could change as a group of scientists are attempting to trace the artist and inventor’s DNA.

 

Researchers hope they will be able to reconstruct the face from genetic materials – such as hairs within a painting – while bones could allow researchers to reconstruct the face of the Italian polymath.

 

 

 

10 Things I Liked Enough to Share With You: 24 April 2016

one.

“A big milestone as Queen Elizabeth turns 90,” by ONE News:

Royalty or not, 90 is an impressive number for anyone.

 

two.

“Susan B. Anthony would be proud to see her grave covered with New Yorkers’ ‘I Voted’ stickers,” by Colby Itkowitz for The Washington Post:

After they cast their votes in Tuesday’s New York primary, several dozen New Yorkers visited the pioneer of the women’s rights movement.

 

Throughout the day, they arrived at the grave of Susan B. Anthony in Rochester’s Mount Hope Cemetery. They came to say thank you to the woman who paved the way for them to be able to fulfill their civic right. They took their “I Voted” sticker and pressed it on the tombstone.

 

Because, in a sense, she had.

 

three.

“Dutch Divers Found a 17th-Century Dress Buried Under the Sea,” by Danny Lewis for Smithsonian.com:

Centuries ago, the islands of Texel and Eyerland (they merged in 1835 to become the island of Texel) were important waypoints for trade ships on their way to Holland. And divers have long known that the waters around present-day Texel Island hold a trove of sunken ships that were unable to survive Wadden Sea’s storms and severe weather to make it safely to shore. But recently, a group of divers found something amazing buried under the Wadden Sea: a 17th-century chest containing a surprisingly well-preserved collection of clothing, books and other items that may have once belonged to an English noblewoman.

 

four.

“Researchers recreate King Richard III’s grave and body with 3D technology,” from The Vintage News:

The grave of King Richard III was discovered under a parking lot in Leicester in September 2012. He was re-interred at Leicester Cathedral on March 26th in 2015. Now, experts have decided to recreate his skeleton and grave.

 

five.

“Annie Leibovitz Photos Show Relaxed Queen and Little Royals,” by REUTERS for NBC News:

Three new portraits of Queen Elizabeth taken by American photographer Annie Leibovitz were released on Thursday to mark Britain’s longest-reigning monarch’s 90th birthday.

 

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seven.

“Woman travels 12 hours to USS Wisconsin to reconnect with her late grandfather,” by Denise M. Watson for The Virginian-Pilot:

Chelsea Schell and her friends had driven 12 long hours to stand before the gray, hulking mass anchored in Norfolk, the city her grandpa had talked about for years. She’d been planning this journey from Waterford, Mich., for months. She carried a couple of black-and-white photos of her grandpa, James Schell, that would’ve been taken 70 years ago somewhere aboard the battleship Wisconsin.

Chelsea Schell

 

eight.

“Historians Identify 35 Descendants of Leonardo da Vinci,” by Jason Daley for Smithsonian.com:

When Leonardo da Vinci died in 1519, the artist, inventor and all-around Renaissance man left behind 6,000 journal pages and dozens of personal questions that remain unanswered to this day. This week, however, a pair of historians in Florence shone some light on the enigmatic genius, revealing Leonardo’s genealogy, including newly discovered burial grounds for his family, and 35 living descendents.

leonardo_portrait

 

nine.

“Message in bottle confirmed as world’s oldest – and nets German woman shilling reward,” from The Telegraph:

A message in a bottle which washed up more than 108 years after it was thrown into the sea has been confirmed as the world’s oldest.

 

ten.

“Anzac Day: Four generations of ‘Dupers’ family on pilgrimage to France to tribute ‘Uncle Jim’,” by James Glenday for ABC:

On a freezing day on the western front in France, a man holding a stuffed kangaroo cries, “Dupers follow me!”.

 

The door of a massive coach opens and four generations of the Duperouzel family, from three different countries, spill out into the military cemetery at Villers-Brettoneux.

 

It is the climax of an epic pilgrimage in tribute to “Uncle Jim”.

 

 

 

10 Things I Liked Enough to Share With You: 21 March 2016

one.

“Video: Why People Never Smiled in Old Photos,” by Michael Zhang for PetaPixel:

Here’s a 3-minute video that explores why you almost never see portraits of smiling people from the early days of photography.

 

two.

“Generation saga: Relatives of Annie Moore traced,” by Roche for The Irish Times:

She’s been the symbol of generations of Irish emigrants full of hope leaving home to carve out a new life in America. But it is only now – almost 125 years after she became the first person to pass through Ellis Island in New York – that Annie Moore’s relatives in Ireland have been traced.

 

three.

“Thanks to DNA ancestry project, Mainers with Irish ties find family,” by Kelley Bouchard for Portland Press Herald:

Started in 2011, the DNA project is sponsored by the Maine Irish Heritage Center in Portland and overseen by several volunteers, including Gellerson. Collectively, they have spent thousands of hours and their own dollars developing what is essentially a massive family tree of Irish immigrants who came to Maine in the wake of the Industrial Revolution and the Great Famine of 1845-1852.

 

four.

“Why I’m Proud to Be a Daughter of the American Revolution in the 21st Century,” by Cynthia Moore for Town&Country:

Who joins the Daughters of the American Revolution in this day and age? Plenty of women. Access to genealogical records is more readily available than ever before, so the group is growing in size and diversity. We’re not all thin-lipped white women with our noses in the air.

 

five.

“Waldoboro funeral home extracts DNA from deceased for families,” by Jim Keithley for WMTW.com:

CG Labs, based in Ontario, Canada, has announced a relationship with a Maine funeral home that will provide the extraction of DNA from the deceased.

Waldoboro Funeral Home

 

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seven.

“Turning hard-to-read cursive into computer type,” by John Laidler for The Boston Globe:

Now a nearly completed initiative by the Norfolk County registry is promising to make it much easier for modern readers to decipher the contents of the Adams deed and other old land records. In what officials say is the first project of its kind in New England, the registry in Dedham is transcribing into type all the county’s handwritten deeds from the time of its founding in 1793 to 1900, when the office switched to typing its documents.

 

eight.

“‘Hugely important’ iron age remains found at Yorkshire site,” by Nazia Parveen for The Guardian:

Almost 2,000 years after being buried, the remarkably well-preserved remains of 150 skeletons and their personal possessions have been discovered in a small market town at the foot of the Yorkshire Wolds.

 

The remains of the burial ground that contained skeletons of people from the middle-iron age Arras culture in Pocklington, east Yorkshire is being hailed as one of the largest and most significant iron age findings of recent times.

 

nine.

“Appleton police trying to identify officer in historic photo,” by Sari Soffer for WBAY.com:

Appleton police are looking for your help identifying a man — not a suspect this time — but an officer from the early 1900s..

 

ten.

“Rijksmuseum”:

The many shapes and sizes of Catwalk.

https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/catwalk

 

 

 

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